Movie Production equipment, movie cameras and film lights

Category Archives: Film Production


Technical Specs (2) 7’6″ Professional Quality Aluminum Adjustable Light Stand Height: Adjustable from 2’3″ – 7’6″ Weight: 2.5 lbs Closed Length: 27″ Stem: 5/8” Stem Screw: 1/4″ Foot print:2’4″ Base Tube Diameter: 1.5″ Die Cast Aluminum Construction Quick and Easily Fold Slip Resistant Rubber Tipped Legs Black Non-Glare Finish Quick Release Levers for Smooth Height Adjustments (2) StudioPRO Premium Daylight LED 600 Light Panel Aluminum Casing Model Number: S-600D Daylight 5600K balanced light output Dimmable, flicker free dial Includes diffusion filter, amber/orange filter Weight: 8 lbs LED Count: 600 CRI > 90 Illumination: 6800 LM at 1 meter 6800 Lux at 1 meter distance 1800 Lux at 2 meter distance 780 Lux at 3 meter distance Wattage: 36W V-lock battery compatible Power adapter included 100V-240V Panel Dimensions: 15.5″x3″x16″ (2) StudioPRO LED Barndoor Light Modifier for 600 LED Measures: 12.25″x12.25″ Color: Black Product Description The StudioPRO Premium Daylight LED 600 Light Panel with Aluminum Casing is a 5600-Kelvin full spectrum daylight balanced LED panel light that is great for photography or video. Each have 600 long-lasting individual LED bulbs. Each emits 6800 lumens of light at a one meter distance, which is dimmable with a stepless dial located on the back of the light panel. These lightweight panels are great for on location videography or photo shoots. The 600 LED light panel produces a longer illumination than normal compact fluorescent lights, because each LED bulb produces a 30-degree angle beam, directing the light further forward. Each panel includes one soft light Read more…


Film Production Management will tell you in step-by-step detail how to produce a screenplay and get it onto the big screen. Whether you are an aspiring or seasoned film professional, this book will be an indispensable resource for you on a day-to-day basis. This updated edition remains true to the practical, hands-on approach that has made previous editions so successful, and has been updated with revised forms, permits, and budgets applicable to all productions; contains important information on standards and typical processes and practices; includes the latest information available on technological advances such as digital FX; and discusses the impact of the Internet on filmmaking. Film production professionals at all levels of experience will benefit from the information in this handbook to film production management.


THE DIGITAL FILMMAKING HANDBOOK, FIFTH EDITION is the one-stop resource to guide you in taking your digital film project from initial concept to finished project. Covering everything from writing and pre-production planning to shooting and post-production editing and effects, the book has been thoroughly updated to cover the latest hardware, software, and production processes. It also now includes coverage of the latest filmmaking-related apps and the shift toward digital distribution. You’ll learn the ins and outs of the craft and you’ll pick up techniques for creating shots and effects that transcend typical “low-budget” productions. Whether your goal is to create an industrial project, a short subject for a website, or a feature-length movie for a film festival, THE DIGITAL FILMMAKING HANDBOOK, FIFTH EDITION will guide you every step of the way.


Gain a comprehensive understanding of the business of entertainment and learn to successfully engage in all related aspects of global production and exploitation with this revised and updated handbook.With The Producer’s Business Handbook as a guide, you’ll learn to create the relationships that the most successful producers have with the various participants in the motion picture industry-this guide provides a global view of how producers direct their relationships with domestic and foreign studios, agencies, attorneys, talent, completion guarantors, banks, and private investors. You get a thorough orientation to operating production development and single-purpose production companies. You’ll also become familiar with the team roles needed to operate these companies, and learn how to attach and direct them. For those outside the US, also included is information on how to produce successful films without government funding.This edition has been updated to include comprehensive information on the internal greenlighting process, government financing, and determining actual cost-of-money. It includes new, simplified project evaluation tools, expediting funding and distribution.Together with its companion website (www.focalpress.com/cw/leejr-9780240814636/)–which contains valuable forms and spreadsheets, tutorials, and samples-this handbook presents both instruction and worksheet support to independent producers at all levels of experience.


With over 20 hours of video being uploaded to YouTube every minute, how can a young filmmaker possibly stand out? By reading and applying the tools of Filmmaking for Teens


Film Production Management 101 and Patz’ previous Surviving Production were quickly adopted as “the” essential road map to the business and logistics of on-the-job film & television production since 1997. Originally developed from practical tools Patz created for her film and television production career, this new edition has undergone a comprehensive update to address the shifting balance between digital and film technologies and to pave the way as we progress further into the digital age. The book includes everything from budgeting, to managing the production office, to script revisions, to cost reporting, to copyright, to publicity, and much, much more. With Patz’ penchant for sharing knowledge and her knack for communicating concepts, Film Production Management 101 continues to be the book you have to have open on your desk for every prep, shoot, and wrap day. The more than 50 useful forms and checklists which are included (and downloadable) will save you time, money, and headaches, working like a pro right from day one.


What the industry’s most succcessful writers and directors have in common is that they have mastered the cinematic conventions specific to the medium.


Few jobs in Hollywood are as shrouded in mystery as the role of the producer. What does it take to be a producer, how does one get started, and what on earth does one actually do? In So You Want to Be a Producer Lawrence Turman, the producer of more than forty films, including The Graduate, The River Wild, Short Circuit, and American History X, and Endowed Chair of the famed Peter Stark Producing Program at the University of Southern California, answers these questions and many more. Examining all the nuts and bolts of production, such as raising money and securing permissions, finding a story and developing a script, choosing a director, hiring actors, and marketing your project, So You Want to Be a Producer is a must-have resource packed with insider information and first-hand advice from top Hollywood producers, writers, and directors, offering invaluable help for beginners and professionals alike. Including a comprehensive case study of Turman’s film The Graduate, this complete guide to the movie industry’s most influential movers and shakers brims with useful tips and contains all the information you need to take your project from idea to the big screen.


How to Shoot Video That Doesn’t Suck is a quick and easy guide that will make your video better instantly– whether you read it cover to cover or just skim a few chapters.  It’s about the language of video. How to think like a director, regardless of equipment (amateurs think about the camera, pros think about communication).  It’s about the rules developed over a century of movie-making–which work just as well when shooting a two-year-old’s birthday party. Written by Steve Stockman, the director of Two Weeks (2007), plus TV shows, music videos, and hundreds of commercials, How to Shoot Video That Doesn’t Suck explains in 74 short, pithy, insightful chapters how to tell a story and entertain your audience. How to shoot video people will want to watch. Here’s how to think in shots–how to move-point-shoot-stop-repeat, instead of planting yourself in one spot and pressing “Record” for five minutes. Why never to shoot until you see the whites of your subject’s eyes. Why to “zoom” with your feet and not the lens. How to create intrigue on camera. The book covers the basics of video production: framing, lighting, sound (use an external mic), editing, special effects (turn them off!), and gives advice on shooting a variety of specific situations: sporting events, parties and family gatherings, graduations and performances. Plus, how to make instructional and promotional videos, how to make a music video, how to capture stunts, and much more. At the end of every chapter is a suggestion of how to immediately put Read more…


The Complete Film Production Handbook is a comprehensive step-by-step guide covering the essentials of the business, from checklists and sample pre-production and post production schedules to contracts and company policies relating to insurance, talent management, and even customs and immigration details. The book contains all of the many necessary forms including SAG, DGA, and WGA forms, together with standard production forms, deal memos, and release forms which are found both in the book and on companion CD. This book provides producers and production managers with both a quick reference and refresher and an easy means of training their production staff on the day to day procedures needed to keep their production running smoothly. It provides film students with an in-depth look at what must be considered and accomplished before a single camera can roll and a more comprehensive understanding of the logistics that are required to complete and deliver a finished picture. First time independent filmmakers will find this the most comprehensive and helpful resource guide available.The third edition includes substantial updates throughout. New chapters examine such topics as:Basic accounting proceduresProduction team members and their responsibilitiesWorking with vendors–negotiating deals. Saving moneyWorking with extrasForeign locations–Work visas, shipping and customs