Movie Production equipment, movie cameras and film lights

Category Archives: Film Industry


Voice & Vision is a comprehensive manual for the independent filmmakers and film students who want a solid grounding in the tools, techniques, and processes of narrative film in order to achieve their artistic vision. This book includes essential and detailed information on relevant film and digital video tools, a thorough overview of the filmmaking stages, and the aesthetic considerations for telling a visual story. The ultimate goal of this book is to help you develop your creative voice while acquiring the solid practical skills and confidence to use it. Unlike many books that privilege raw technical information or the line-producing aspects of production, Voice & Vision places creativity, visual expression, and cinematic ideas front and center. After all, every practical decision a filmmaker makes, like choosing a location, an actor, a film stock, a focal length, a lighting set-up, an edit point, or a sound effect is also an expressive one and should serve the filmmaker’s vision. Every decision, from the largest conceptual choices to the smallest practical solutions, has a profound impact on what appears on the screen and how it moves an audience. “In Practice” sidebars throughout connect conceptual, aesthetic and technical issues to their application in the real world. Some provide a brief analysis of a scene or technique from easily rentable films which illustrate how a specific technology or process is used to support a conceptual, narrative, or aesthetic choice. Others recount common production challenges encountered on real student and professional shoots which will inspire Read more…


With the growth of film festivals, cable networks, specialty home video, and the Internet, there are more outlets and opportunities for screening short films now than at any time in the last 100 years. But before you can screen your short film, you need to shoot it. And before you can shoot it, you need to write it. The Short Screenplay provides both beginning and experienced screenwriters with all the guidance they need to write compelling, filmable short screenplays. Explore how to develop characters that an audience can identify with. How to create a narrative structure that fits a short time frame but still engages the audience. How to write dialogue that’s concise and memorable. How to develop story ideas from concept through final draft. All this and much more is covered in a unique conversational style that reads more like a novel than a “how-to” book. The book wraps up with a discussion of the role of the screenplay in the production process and with some helpful (and entertaining) sample scripts. This is the only guide you’ll ever need to make your short film a reality!


When is “groucho” not a comedian? A “seagull” not a bird? A “banana” not a fruit, and a “taco cart” not a food stand? What’s the “Castle rock rule” and when should you call for a “buff & puff”? And why expect trouble when the A.D. (assistant director) knowingly mumbles “Gone With the Wind in the morning, Dukes of Hazzard after lunch”? An oral tradition gathered and passed down for more than a hundred years, the language of moviemaking, like other secret lexicons, is the only accepted way of communicating on a set—and is all but unknown to the outside world. Technical, odd, colorful, mysterious, the working language of movies sheds light not only on the hugely complex process of making a film, but on the invisible hierarchies of a set, the unspoken etiquette between cast and crew, and the evolution of a process that’s endlessly fascinating. Movie Speak is a book about language, but through language also a book about what it’s really like to be a director or a producer or an actor or a crew member. An Oscarwinning producer (The Sting), actor (who worked with Spielberg, Coppola, and Sydney Pollock), and director (Five Corners, Flyboys, My Bodyguard, and more), Tony Bill has been on sets for more than 30 years and brings a writer’s love of language to this collection of hundreds of film terms. A futz. A cowboy. A Brodkin and a double Brodkin (a.k.a. screamer). Streaks ’n tips, a Lewinsky, Green Acres, rhubarb, a peanut, Read more…


This is a complete business plan for a Film Production Company. Each of our plans follows a 7 chapter format: Chapter 1 – Executive Summary – This part of the business plan provides an introduction for the business, showcases how much money is sought for the company, and acts as a guideline for reading the rest of the business plan. Chapter 2 – Financing Summary – The second section of the business plan showcases how you intend to use the financing for your business, how much of the business is owned by the Owners, who sits on the board of directors, and how the business could be sold in the future. Chapter 3 – Products and Services – This section of the business plan showcases the products/services that you are selling coupled with other aspects of your business operations. Chapter 4 – Market Analysis – This is one of the most important sections of your business plan. Each of our plans includes complete industry research specific to the business, an economic analysis regarding the general economy, a customer profile, and a competitive analysis. Chapter 5 – Marketing Plan – Your marketing plan will showcase to potential investors or banks how you intend to properly attract customers to your business. We provide an in depth analysis of how you can use your marketing plan in order to drive sales. Chapter 6 – Personnel Summary – Here, we showcase the organizational structure of your business coupled with the headcount and salaries of Read more…


If you’ve ever toyed with the idea of becoming a filmmaker but never acted on it, this primer for filmmaking will get you started in the right direction. Here is an overview of the key areas of filmmaking: screenwriting, directing, cinematography, sound, editing, and producing. Plus, a look at documentary and low budget production strategies. The “ten essential lessons” are a compilation of several articles and lessons from the Film School Online website by NYU Film School’s long time production supervisor, Lou LaVolpe. Length: approximately 45 pages.


Ed Sikov builds a step-by-step curriculum for the appreciation of all types of narrative cinema, detailing the essential elements of film form and systematically training the spectator to be an active reader and critic. Sikov primes the eye and mind in the special techniques of film analysis. His description of mise-en-scene helps readers grasp the significance of montage, which in turn reveals the importance of a director’s use of camera movement. He treats a number of fundamental factors in filmmaking, including editing, composition, lighting, the use of color and sound, and narrative. Film Studies works with any screening list and can be used within courses on film history, film theory, or popular culture. Straightforward explanations of core critical concepts, practical advice, and suggested assignments on particular technical, visual, and aesthetic aspects further anchor the reader’s understanding of the formal language and anatomy of film.


Making Your Video Look Like Film There are several things you can do in post-production to make your video look like film, and I’m going to talk with you about them in this article. It’s important to understand that video, by nature, will never be film. Just like they’ve made electronic instruments such as pianos and drums that sound so close to their ‘real’ counterparts that only the most trained ear can hear the difference and only the most astute player can feel it, there is still a difference. The Way Film Looks It would be fantastic if the video you just shot on your handheld camcorder could look just like film does when you see a movie in the theater? Well, beyond the simple fact that good sound design does more than you probably realize to make a movie great, you first have to know what you’re looking for. What does film look like? Let me ask you a question. What do you think. Unless you’re sitting there with your hand raised, ready to shout out a bunch of specific qualities you love about film off the top of your head, chances are you couldn’t rattle them off even if you had time to think about it. Can you really describe in concrete terms the qualities that make film look the way it does? Well, for those of you who aren’t scholars, directors, or film students, I’ll tell you why you want that film look so badly in your Read more…


Have you ever wanted to Light your own movie scene? If you’re like me you’ve seen many dark horror films, a well-lit romantic comedy, and a gritty and grim war movie. Digital effects are sometimes used to colorize the film during post-production, but what gives each of these types of films its unique look and feel is the knowledge of how to light a scene and the type of lighting used on location. There are a couple of simple movie lighting techniques you can employ that will get your lighting just right for your video. The first of these is basic three-point lighting, which you can experiment with below. Three-Point Lighting Key Light This is the most focused, directional light used in the three-point setup. It is used to illuminate the strong or dominant side of the subject (determined by which way they are facing, or from the left by default). The key light creates the largest amount of light of any of the three and is usually set the furthest away from the subject, being directed in a slightly narrower beam than the others if possible. As a result it also tends to create the most obvious shadows. Fill Light The fill is used to offset the harshness and the sharp shadows that can be caused by the key light. It is a softer, more indirect light that not only fills out the opposing side of the subject, but lights up the immediate surrounding area. Using a diffuser or Read more…


A key grip is actually the chief supervisor of a union crew responsible for moving lights, dolly tracks, cranes and scenery. While grips are primarily hired for their physical strength and construction skills, a key grip also has some administrative responsibilities. This person works very closely with the head electrician, known in the movie business as a gaffer. As part of a pre-production movie crew, the key grip, gaffer, director of photography and a location producer will discuss the logistics of a specific filming site. All of these people must understand the needs of the script and have an understanding of how difficult a particular location shot might be. The key grip must determine if lights can be rigged up safely on a mountainous set. It is the work of grips, working under the supervision of a key grip, to install these tracks and remove them after the shots. Ad Experienced grips with good work practices can be promoted to the position of ‘grip boss’. The grip boss works closely with the key grip in order to translate general orders into specific job assignments. Most film work is contractual, so any qualified grip may be hired as a key grip for the duration of the production. Quite often the production company will hire an experienced and respected key grip and then allow him or her to handpick a crew. A film construction crew which works well together can help a director meet his own production schedule with minimal downtime.